Category: Books


I have done a lot of reading lately. This is my 3rd book in as many weeks. I found this one while researching Jesus Christ’s life and it intrigued me.

In 1887, Nicolas Notovitch—a Belarusian Jewish adventurer and self-proclaimed Russian aristocrat and journalist—traveling to India to study the Hindu culture comes across an interesting find. While recovering from a broken leg in a Buddhist monastery in the Himalayas the abbot told him of a manuscript they had in their possession that was written of a Saint Issa. According to the Buddhist monks Saint Issa was Jesus Christ. The monks said that he was with them learning and preaching. He had many followers and apparently was held in great respect by the Buddhists.

Nicolas received permission to see this manuscript and had it read to him by his translator while he wrote the translation down. It was fourteen chapters of 244 verses in total, titled “Life of Saint Issa, The Best of the Sons of Men.”

Some inaccuracies were pointed out in his story and the true existence of this manuscript. So at the beginning Nicolas was discredited, however that does not explain the other 9 people that have witnessed the existence of the manuscript in question. To this day it is still a controversial finding.

Peace, Love, and Happiness to you all.

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This book is a good read on the way to a meaningful life. It has daily exercises to achieve and maintain a meaningful life. According to the Dalai Lama this is accomplished through morality, concentrated meditation, and finally wisdom. Of course, since this book goes through the path of the Buddhist it may feel strange, awkward, or different. To be honest, it is. It may be difficult at times but change is always difficult because it is going against what you have always known. Stay with it and you will flourish with amazing results.

The main principle of Buddhist morality is to help others and, if that is not possible, at least to do no harm.

As the Dalai Lama says, “True change is within; leave the outside as it is. Spiritual practice is not about externals—food, clothes, or the like. Spiritual practice takes place in our hearts, in our minds. If your behavior truly reflects an improved mind and heart, that is fine. However, if you are just making a show of your spiritual accomplishments in order to get money, for example, that is hypocrisy.”

There are many things that can be taken from this book without converting to Buddhism. Exercises in this book can be put into practice in everyone’s daily life.

The lessons I have learned from this reading has helped me grow spiritually, mentally, and physically. I am glad that I took the time to read this book. If you want to make any improvements in your life you should read this good book. It will change your life too.

Peace, Love, and Happiness to you all.

Interesting read. I finished reading it several weeks ago but have just now got around to this post. Events come along for a reason and I think my introduction to this book happens at just the right time in my life. I can relate to Ed with his life in a quandary. Everything is going wrong in his life, from bad relationship to job troubles. He meets an unlikely Buddhist name Geoff in a pub. To Geoff problems are just facts. It’s our attitude towards them that makes us suffer or not.

Geoff uses a comparison of low tide and high tide to describe life states; “It’s your life state, mate. I told you the second time I met you: if your life condition’s low all this negative stuff just appears, like the rocks at low tide. They’re always there, but when the tide’s in – when your life condition is high – they disappear. You literally rise above it all…” This is so true. When your life state is strong, you feel like you can conquer the world. The strong actually go out seeking challenges: more dragons to fight, more damsels to rescue, whatever the case may be.

Ed’s realization is that Buddhahood is not some airy-fairy mental thing, or about sitting on a mountaintop somewhere being ‘enlightened’. It’s about getting your hands dirty and actually changing things for the better. As Geoff says approach everything with WCC—wisdom, courage and compassion—the wisdom to know what to do, the courage to do it, and the compassion that through the action everyone would benefit.

I love this book. Even though it is fiction, it still adheres to the beliefs of Buddhism. Now that I have read it, Buddhism has intrigued me even more.

Peace

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