Tag Archive: Buddhism


I have done a lot of reading lately. This is my 3rd book in as many weeks. I found this one while researching Jesus Christ’s life and it intrigued me.

In 1887, Nicolas Notovitch—a Belarusian Jewish adventurer and self-proclaimed Russian aristocrat and journalist—traveling to India to study the Hindu culture comes across an interesting find. While recovering from a broken leg in a Buddhist monastery in the Himalayas the abbot told him of a manuscript they had in their possession that was written of a Saint Issa. According to the Buddhist monks Saint Issa was Jesus Christ. The monks said that he was with them learning and preaching. He had many followers and apparently was held in great respect by the Buddhists.

Nicolas received permission to see this manuscript and had it read to him by his translator while he wrote the translation down. It was fourteen chapters of 244 verses in total, titled “Life of Saint Issa, The Best of the Sons of Men.”

Some inaccuracies were pointed out in his story and the true existence of this manuscript. So at the beginning Nicolas was discredited, however that does not explain the other 9 people that have witnessed the existence of the manuscript in question. To this day it is still a controversial finding.

Peace, Love, and Happiness to you all.

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This book is a good read on the way to a meaningful life. It has daily exercises to achieve and maintain a meaningful life. According to the Dalai Lama this is accomplished through morality, concentrated meditation, and finally wisdom. Of course, since this book goes through the path of the Buddhist it may feel strange, awkward, or different. To be honest, it is. It may be difficult at times but change is always difficult because it is going against what you have always known. Stay with it and you will flourish with amazing results.

The main principle of Buddhist morality is to help others and, if that is not possible, at least to do no harm.

As the Dalai Lama says, “True change is within; leave the outside as it is. Spiritual practice is not about externals—food, clothes, or the like. Spiritual practice takes place in our hearts, in our minds. If your behavior truly reflects an improved mind and heart, that is fine. However, if you are just making a show of your spiritual accomplishments in order to get money, for example, that is hypocrisy.”

There are many things that can be taken from this book without converting to Buddhism. Exercises in this book can be put into practice in everyone’s daily life.

The lessons I have learned from this reading has helped me grow spiritually, mentally, and physically. I am glad that I took the time to read this book. If you want to make any improvements in your life you should read this good book. It will change your life too.

Peace, Love, and Happiness to you all.

Change the World

There are billions of us on this tiny blue dot in this universe we live. Each and every one of us is so small and insignificant compared to the overall picture of this earth and in the whole universe.

In society, no matter what your religion, race, creed, gender, sexual orientation, or color, we need to strive to be better. We all need to strive for wisdom, learn compassion, and have the courage to change. Wash the negativity from your mind. What is the phrase used widely today, “Don’t be a hater.”

Lay down your guns. Why do we need guns if we all want a peaceful society? All it takes is one brief moment to take a life. That fraction of time changes lives. Even if it was unintentional. Accidents happen all the time, especially with children.

“All the energy that the human race uses to destroy each other can be used wisely to underscore our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another.” I believe Carl Sagan said that in one of his videos.

We humans are capable of greatness if we can choose the right path. We need to save ourselves from our childish mistakes. It is not all about you and it is not all about me. It is all about the collective. It is not about how much stuff you can collect and own. It is not about keeping up with the Joneses but caring and helping the Joneses. Take a little time out of your schedule and do for those that cannot do for themselves. Just do one act of kindness and see how you feel afterwards.

All the sayings and proverbs in the world do not mean a thing unless you take action. You can read them all you want. That alone will not make change.

It all starts from within oneself. I vow to do my part to change the world. Join in on changing the world because without change this pale blue dot…well it may just cease to exist.

Take care of our planet, it is the only one we have. Take care of humanity and take care of one another.

Peace, love, and happiness to us all!

Interesting read. I finished reading it several weeks ago but have just now got around to this post. Events come along for a reason and I think my introduction to this book happens at just the right time in my life. I can relate to Ed with his life in a quandary. Everything is going wrong in his life, from bad relationship to job troubles. He meets an unlikely Buddhist name Geoff in a pub. To Geoff problems are just facts. It’s our attitude towards them that makes us suffer or not.

Geoff uses a comparison of low tide and high tide to describe life states; “It’s your life state, mate. I told you the second time I met you: if your life condition’s low all this negative stuff just appears, like the rocks at low tide. They’re always there, but when the tide’s in – when your life condition is high – they disappear. You literally rise above it all…” This is so true. When your life state is strong, you feel like you can conquer the world. The strong actually go out seeking challenges: more dragons to fight, more damsels to rescue, whatever the case may be.

Ed’s realization is that Buddhahood is not some airy-fairy mental thing, or about sitting on a mountaintop somewhere being ‘enlightened’. It’s about getting your hands dirty and actually changing things for the better. As Geoff says approach everything with WCC—wisdom, courage and compassion—the wisdom to know what to do, the courage to do it, and the compassion that through the action everyone would benefit.

I love this book. Even though it is fiction, it still adheres to the beliefs of Buddhism. Now that I have read it, Buddhism has intrigued me even more.

Peace

LIFE GOES ON

As a fork in the road sprung a leak in my life a few months ago, it left me reevaluating things and thinking what is important to me? Of course, there is family—this includes my pack of animals—and friends at the top of the list. I would have to say that creating peace, love, and compassion in my heart comes next. If I cannot bring these to my heart, how can I for someone else? I would also have to gain wisdom and the courage to apply these things into my life.

That being said, two things come to mind. First, two faults that I have at the moment are procrastination and lack of motivation. Two qualities that make it very difficult to get things done. This is weird considering my background as a Marine. If anyone knows a Marine you know they lead a disciplined life. At least I know I did when I was on active duty and up unto my depression. My best bet is to get back to a routine every day to try to develop consistency. However, it seems the harder I try the harder it is to do. MEF is telling me otherwise. What is MEF you may ask? Well that is the little voice in the back of my mind saying all the negative things that hold me back; MEF—My Evil Friend. I borrowed that from Ed in the book The Buddha, Geoff, and Me.

Second, I am looking for an anchor. In my past, as I have said before I have been a disciplined human being, however, since my recent recovery from depression, anxiety, and a failed relationship I feel I am in a tailspin, out of control, out of focus, and lacking motivation. I need something to put my life back together and to have meaning.

I never was a believer in GOD this is why I turn to Buddhism. The Christian traditions did not have anything for me. I have done research—as you know from my previous posts concerning My Journey in life—and I am looking to get involved but have no idea which tradition of Buddhism. My only insight is my own research online and reading books. There are not a whole lot of resources where I live. It frustrates me that there are so many different traditions, which one do I follow? In my research, I have found Jodo-Shin, Vipassana, Kagyu Tibetan, Zen, Bon Tibetan, Soka Gakkai, Vajrayana, Mahayana, Pure Land, Theravada, and Nichiren. I am sure there is more but these are just to mention a few. I read about or come across a new tradition daily. Each tradition has its minute differences but all have the same basic beliefs. Maybe I will see what I can find around my city and start there.

If anyone has insight on any of these traditions or others, I would be gladly appreciative if you shared your knowledge and experiences.

My next step is to learn meditation. I have meditated for about a week and it looks promising. I still have a lot to learn.

Life is not going to stop still while I recover; I have to keep going…LIFE GOES ON! I am excited to see what is around the next corner or fork in the road.

Peace

LIFE…

I dedicate this post to my Loving Mom.  She passed away on Monday, August 12, 2013.  She lived a full life and she will be missed.  You never know when some things are going to happen, you only wish you had a little more time.  Rest in Peace MOM.

A journey through life may be a short one but then something difficult happens that changes everything.  Whether the cause is by depression, hard-times, mid-life, death, tragic event, or whatever the case may be.  These events start a thinking process in your mind to make changes.  Lately I am, I guess you can call it, a profound thinker and I have changes to make in my life.  By attaining knowledge and understanding about the meaning of life, I will vow to make changes by going beneath the superficial, external and the obvious.  Life is much deeper than these things.

 

It is as if my eyes are finally wide-open taking in everything with a new spirit.  The superficial, external, and the meaningless blinded my eyes for many years but now my rebirth is beginning.

 

In the past, I would walk down the street passing by a homeless person and not think twice about their suffering.  However, today I walk by a homeless man and his dog.  I could not stop thinking about his and his dog’s suffering.  This man’s suffering causes a ripple effect and now his dog is suffering.  Now the ripple effect is witnessed by me and therefor has changed me.  This man’s suffering causes a ripple effect throughout everyone’s life that will witness it.  One moment in time, what will you do in that moment?  The only way to end suffering is by everyone doing acts of kindness.  We need to stop the ripple effect of suffering.

 

I would not say that life is a waste but sometimes it takes people longer to realize what is actually important.  There comes a point in time when you set aside all this superficial meaningless things and concentrate on the more important.  This has nothing to do with religion or the pursuit of religion but the pursuit of spiritual truth to love, life, happiness, and peace.  Without that, you have nothing.

 

Take a stroll down memory lane with me.  Would you do things any different?  Not in your life but in someone else’s.  I don’t regret anything but I do see where I can make improvements to someone’s life.  I usually leave the New Year resolutions for reflection and improvements but that is one thing that I am changing today.  Every day if there is a means there is a way.  Sometimes it will require creativity.  There are acts of kindness witnessed around the world but we need more.  We all need to help.

 

This is what life is all about helping our fellow man, woman, child, and all living creatures roaming this earth.

 

Pursue love, happiness, life, and peace in all we do.

 

Peace!!!

We need to understand…

We need to understand the inadequacy of an educational system so slanted towards material values. The solution is not to give an occasional lecture, but to integrate ethics into the educational curriculum. To do this effectively requires a secular ethics, free of religious influence, based on common sense, a realistic view and scientific findings. ~ Dalai Lama

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